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is bob hayden. i am with the department of the environment and pleased to be the emcee of this event. you can tell from the display that this has something to do with some electric vehicles. so, i would like to start the program with our first presenter. and introduce to you a man who is certainly no stranger to bringing clean technology to san francisco and electric vehicles, are mayor, ed lee. [applause] >> thank you, bob. >> you for your leadership. good morning, everyone. we are going to be talking about something that i have been very interested in, and that is mobility. the ability to have technology work for you, like this microphone. we have worked hard for a number of years. i had the privilege of working with gavin newsom in the past to during his administration to create the electric vehicle infrastructure for the city and began the conversation and the collaboration with the other counties to bring an electric vehicle corridor. it signals our efforts to support the creation of infrastructure to the electric vehicle industry. of course we have encouraged the private automobile
san francisco's environment and the global environment as a whole so please welcome mayor ed lee. >> michael, matt, congratulations to scoot, yes. scoot and san francisco, well, let me first of all put this in some little perspective that i know, i know that we just announced last week, eb week in san francisco to the delight of so many people who want to just have modes of transportation, multiple modes of transportation in a city that are also environmentally friendly and to contribute that reducing our fossil fuels, we are in san francisco world citizens after all and i know it's exciting for ed risken, our mta manager, he and i were excited to talk about different modes of transportation as we create all these exciting events to come to san francisco. i know it's exciting for board president david chiu, we tried to put pods for car sharing in neighborhoods on public streets and began in russian hill on his district, he's a vibrant, vibrant avid supporter of car sharing as i have been, i know ed riskens, well at the hub, knowing that that's an incubator for great ideas came th
a negative impact on the environment ,. the environment is already user-friendly. i see people put their hands up in the air, turn left on fifteenth street, adds a lot of traffic. rather than to object to the high density of this project, we would ask you to respectfully find a way to reduce the density. we understand that during the hearings the whole idea is to create high-density and it is parking in the market/octavia plan. this lot is unusual. 2100 market has 80 units, and that is a much bigger project. this is a sliver lot on a corner. we would like you to entertain the idea of reducing the density, i put in our position letter is, we would like to have larger, two-bedroom units in this project. i will explain immolated testimony the rationale in more detail. to give you an idea, i own the building on nob hill, i have eight units the same size; in the 15 years i have had that building i have not had one couple with a child apply for any of the units. the whole idea in the general management plan, and the market/octavia plan for two-bedroom units is to be family-friendl
a major impact on the environment. pollution of all sorts began to show up in the air, water, and on land. in turn, the environment began to have an impact on us. nightly newscasts and morning papers are filled with stories about ozone depletion, water and air pollution, and toxic waste in our neighborhoods. while these problems may seem not to affect us personally, we cannot ignore the health hazards that come with living on an interconnected planet. the environment is a crucial factor in the health of each of us. if the environment is not healthy, there is no way we can truly call ourselves healthy. persistent efforts and regulation over the last few decades have greatly reduced environmental pollution. ib: our rivers don't catch on fire anymore. persistent efforts and regulation over the last few decades we don't have big, black plumes in most communities in america. we don't see slicks going down the great lakes. so people believe, because they don't see it, that, somehow, we're in a better state now than we ever were before, and the truth is, that all we've done is cosmetic surgery.
pro-growth. they are trying to run their businesses, in a very competitive environment globally, i think what we hear is a continuation or a promise of a continuation of more of the same policies, which has made american businesses -- it put them in the backseat. we have the highest tax rates in the world. i know there are loopholes but they were created by congress, you know we're in a situation where we're not competitive. we're not able to bring back our earnings from overseas, where we have a situation where we're not creating jobs, we're putting the money on our balance sheets rather than investing it in the american economy. that is unheard of. we need a change in that policy from one administration or another but this needs to change. neil: steve, do you think something changed in the last week? maybe mitt romney's debate performance or the lack there of in the president's where it may have emboldened the ''s critics, and sharpened or jazzed the challengary supporters to speak out to seize on what they think is an opportunity to make the president's one termer. >> i don't kn
to encouraging stewardship of the environment, land conservation, watershed protection and eliminating harmful chemicals. additional funding provided by: the colcom foundation. the wallace genetic foundation and by the charles a. frueauff foundation. >> this week on "to the contrary" first, is affirmative action still necessary? then, latina voter turnout and behind the headlines: women who lead drug cartels. hello, i'm bonnie erbe. welcome to to the contrary, a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. up first, the supreme court and affirmative action. next week justices will hear arguments in an affirmative action case that could change admissions policies at public colleges and universities. it marks the first time the supreme court will address the topic in nearly a decade. fisher v. university of texas at austin involves a white student, abigail fisher, who was denied admission in 2008. it challenges the constitutionality of using race as a factor in admissions decisions. fisher argues the university's race-conscious policy violated her civil and constitutional righ
that meander up and down the park under pines and eucalyptus. hang out in this environment and you might see butterflies it, fennel, and then the lines. -- dandelions. is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. we have conquered the steps, we have watched the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view. this is a place to take someone special on a romantic stroll and enjoyed a beautiful look out. welcome to corona heights located in the heart of this district. it offers a view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. it is one of the best kept secrets in the city. it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. , bought a 37 bus to get there without any parking worries. for legged friends can run freely. there is also a patch of grass for the small box. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place to have these kinds of parks. that dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice of the wildfires that are on the grassland and keep your head out on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. be sure to take your camera and be prepared to ta
and innovate our new ideas for the new economy and our mutual obligations on the environment, and then there is something that paris and san francisco hold very dearly and that's an ongoing conversation about our human rights as world leaders, so it's human rights, it's the environment, it's the economy and these are the reasons why we hold our relationship with paris and with all the other great cities of the world in a sister city relationship so dearly, we learn from each other, we send delegations to each other, we welcome each other to the city but in each and every instance, we are always thinking about ideas about how we can help each other and help regions improve, so i am excited to have met with the mayor just a few minutes ago to reaffirm our relationship and we'll sign that in a few moments to document that and to promise each other that we will continue this very great relationship and we could not have done it without the involvement of our private citizens, tom horn has led a fantastic group of volunteers on our sister city committee for paris and san francisc
natural environment. the mekong river traces an 1,100-mile path through or along the border of laos. the river has also been a barrier between laos and its neighbors. now there is a road, where before there was none. in 1994, the friendship bridge gave laos its first land link with the outside world, through thailand to the west. the bridge may symbolize a connected future, but laos in the here and now remains among the poorest countries in the world. ( rooster crows ) it is the least developed country in the lower mekong basin. life expectancy is low, about 53 years. ( rooster crows % of cn e ourished. the potential changes brought by economic development are enormous. the soil here is rich and fertile. laos remains a largely agrarian society. lowland peoples practice wet rice farming. the capital, vientiane, has a population of just half a million. the rest of the 5½ million laotians are spread over 155 million square miles of land. it'she sonlowestpulaon dena aand the least urbanized country squin the region.and. around laos lie e delopi economies of thailand, china, vietnam and
. they worked at a much closer environment and they cannot be perceived as a snitch. or that they are working with the police department. they are there to, down, emotionally, the anchor. what they do then, we have a shooting war homicide. and they go to the hospital to be with the families. any talk of retaliation -- they will work with our social workers at the hospital. and whether the retaliation must go next. to saturate and prevent and interrupt any violence that may occur. this is a component or peace that has been building. i polled the captains of payview, mission, ingleside and the northern district. these are the most affected by gang violence. they said they appreciated what the crn did what they want to see them more. they need to fill that communication. it also comes down to training and trust, to be able to have them talk to officers. they would address the officers, they had arrested some of them, when there were actually under. they will help the police and the community. under his guidance we are the most active community. of anyone in this country and any department. he pu
policy and the environment and role of large-scale asset purchases. before doing so let me note the usual disclaimer. the thoughts i'm about to give you are my own. do not necessarily reflect the views of others on the fomc. there's a considerable diversity of views within the fomc and within -- commong economists more generally about the use of large-scale asset purchases and other unconventional policy tools. this is both inevitable and healthy given the unprecedented circumstances in which we find ourselves. let me be clear on where i stand. i support the committee's decision of last month, namely to initiate purchases of mortgaged backed securities at a rate of $40 billion a month. in tandem with the ongoing maturity extension program of treasury securities, and to plant a continue those purchases if the committee does not observe a substantial improvement in the waiver market outlook. given where we are, given what we know, i firmly believe that this was the right decision. in my comments today i'm only going to briefly review the case for taking that action as that ground has been w
, small environment in other areas of town and the people will actually gravitate towards the shadows. if that's not the way it would be, then what i would like is that all these tall buildings are being built south of market so that the waterfront is available for expansion for more open space if we want people to sit out in the sun, but i think people like to sit in the shade, so i support this project. i hope you do too. >> commissioner jim lazarus, i'm also here as xhair to have citizen's advisory committee but i first want to tell you, i'm sure some of you have smart phones on, top of the fifth, 6-0 giants on opposing grand slam. [applause]. maybe i'll use my time to continue to follow the game, but the citizen's advisory committee met earlier this week, received the same staff report you received today and supports moving forward with the approvals for the shadow study in the transbay area and the transit tower project specifically. we think it meets a balance between a public benefit and the small increases of shadow which probably will have no adverse affect on the recreationa
question. germany's environment minister believe so, but he says the country has to completely rethink the way it subsidizes renewals. >> with elections due next year, the rising cost of electricity has become an issue. environment minister is calling for a government overhaul of renewable energy. he says current policy favors quantity, not quality. >> we need the appropriate instruments to ensure that the expansion of renewable energy takes place in a steady and predictable fashion, and we want to make renewals competitive on the energy market as soon as possible -- we want to make renewables competitive on the energy market as soon as possible. >> he is also calling on a time line on phasing out government subsidies, and he wants to regulate the pace of the grid, but in germany's greens say the cost of switching to renewable resources are being unfairly distributed. >> stay with us. when we come back, the international community marking the very first girls' state. we will see how schoolgirls in pakistan are showing their support for the 14-year-old activist shot by the taliban. -- m
environment in texas. tough environment for the yankees in baltimore. that is why these guys do what they do. they are the best players in the world. >> jim johnson is pitching all four post-season games. i asked how available he is. he said without hesitation "very." >> joe saunders will start for the orioles tonight. the league championship series of running national league -- in san fran, they swept through for the reds in cincinnati. picking up in the fifth inning. grand slam to left field. damage done. at a late reds rallied. giants win, 6-4. the ravens put the long as the hot win streak against the dallas cowboys. there are preparing to make it 14 this sunday. they see dallas coming off a by. tony romo is coming off and inconsistencies in. they hope to attack him before he can attack them. >> we will just makes it up. whatever that be coverage-was, pressure, one man zone, whatever. we have got to do a good job of not giving up big plays. and we have but to keep the quarterback of balance and the receivers of balance, and then we are in. >> we will see these seven-day forecast coming up
of identifying risky practices that might contaminate the environment or expose workers to high risk, health and safety issues? whistleblowing protection is critical, especially for facilities like the los alamos national laboratory, because of the nature of the work that is done and the kind of materials they work with. >> will take a break and come back. we will be joined also by a guest from the navajo dine nation, to talk about the uranium mines and what happens when they are closed. our guests are chuck montaÑo, former inspector here at the lab who became a whistleblower, and jay coghlan, executive director of nuclear watched mexico. stay with us. ♪ [music break] >> this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are broadcasting from los alamos, new mexico. this state is home to the navajo nation. for decades, they fought uranium mining on their land despite a mining moratorium on the troubled property, the company hydro resources ink is seeking approval to mine near the towns of crownpoint and church rock. uranium has been mined here for mo
the environment is terrible. it's not just banks. we have done this to ourselves. we shot ourselves in the foot. get rid of the wet blanket and we will take off. there was a great article that was reprinted in "the wall street journal" giving president-elect ronald reagan some advice. tell the same positive story over and over and will turn. yet to believe in it. america usually will do the right thing after it has exhausted all other possibilities and i hope we do. if you think washington and business can go to work, the collaboration's, we should have a collaboration. we would double the other and worked round-the-clock but now and has became a war. dodd-frank, health care, so we re-litigate. we should get it right the first time and move on but we did not. >> to the extent there has been a marked absence of collaboration or friction between the worlds of politics and business, you but the lion's share on the political side? >> i would put more on the political side. everyone i know is coming down and asking what they can do for help. it surprised me when someone asked a question, do you want
reimburse the states that have spent money to clean up the environment. only one state in the gulf coast has spent enough money to demand reimbursement from cleaning up the environment, which is louisiana. the other states, texas, alabama, mississippi, they also want money from the feds. my guess is that the feds will distribute that money to the states and will collect a lot of money from b.p., somewhere closer to the $20 billion and this case will be over. >>shepard: over and done with, that is it and b.p. can go on and make more billions. >>judge napolitano: what you said at the outset is significant because the people who received money from b.p. agreed never to sue it again for anything having to do with this. they didn't know that there might be another spill or another sheen coming from the original spill. they will not be able to sue for damages from that. >>shepard: stand by for news. judge napolitano, thank you. >> we are in politics land in kentucky and we will show you the latest polls on the race for the president mechanic -- neck and neck across the nation. and erin will join u
are you worried about the credit environment? are you worried about the tax environment? >> i'm worried about the entire environment, all of the above. you know, i can be a monday morning quarterback. i've lived through four years of the obama administration. four years ago we were doing a billion dollars a year in sales. we had 12,000 employees. today as a result of the last four years we had to cut down to 7,000 employees, and only doing half of the business that we currently were doing. we were growing 20% a year. today we're not growing. and that was before obamacare. that was before higher taxes. that money has to come from somewhere. melissa: that could be function of the recession though. a lot of businesses have contracted overtime. it is not necessarily the president's fault. why do you peg it on him? >> he had four years to turn things around and he hasn't done it. so will we wait another four years and say, well, now it is eight years but we'll blame it on the bush administration? i think, in four years was plenty of time to turn things around. melissa: what do you think that
. we've tried this in a couple instances in this class, which is a totally controlled environment here, but yet people have said, in a few guests we've had, a few activities we've had, people have begun to feel an actual tangible change in their sense of self. and if that can happen in this setting, imagine what happens in one where people are believers and are trained and are attached to this ritual. so it's a huge power. well, just a couple more things. i don't want to forget this thought i have about some of the more negative aspects of ritual, but sacramental - another key feature of rituals. and sacramental is not, in this case, the capital of california; we're talking about the sacrament - that's a great one - juan told me that on the break. we're talking about another key point here. it's taking the ordinary and transforming it into the extraordinary. i mean, that's - sacrament, sacrifice; ascending, descending. i love those balances between the two, because in the sacrament, the divine descends as the human sacrifices some sense of their limited sense of self, and ascends. and
environment, you need to make sure that the rules are clear. so that legislation, tried to create rules in a work environment for some information and they had protection and they could have breaks and they could have all of the protections that we have when we go to work. >> i think this we are a country that is founded on immigrants and i think that actually my ancestors, many people in the audience have been and they came from around the world and across the world. started in new lifes themselves. so, i just support completely the important role that immigrants have and i think that clearly, that there should be a path to citizenship and that there should be a great respect in many ways for all of the things that they do. >> state proposition, 35, asks if the definition of human trafficking should be expanded and the penalties for the traffickers be increased and be registered for sex offenders and training be provided for law enforcement officers. i am curious, what is your position on this? >> i support that. i think that obviously, trafficking is a horrific occurrence that happens
security and begin to undo the damage that our current water system does to the environment. the plan would then be brought back to the voters in 2016 for their aprafl or disapproval so it's placing the city on a trajectory we're not currently on. we don't recycle any water, we've abandoned most ground water since hetch hetchy became available and we've done real damage to the tuolome river and we begin it's time to get in line with the city's values. it's a plan the voters ultimately get to approve. >> i disagree. i think proposition f is about one thing and one thing only, about forcing the city to spend $8 million dollars to conduct a plan that would require us to drain hetch hetchy reservoir at a cost of anywhere between 3 and 10 billion dollars that gets translated to our rate payers at anywhere between $2,000 and $2700 per year per rate payer. this is a proposal largely hoisted upon san franciscoans by outsiders. not one san francisco organization supports this measure. every group from san francisco tomorrow to the republican party across the political spectrum opposes us
to control our preferences. we are victims of our environments growing up. we are victims of our context that we live in and, therefore, we all, you know, are not "responsible for that behavior and therefore should be mitigating." when you look at the testimony that comes in, whether it's from a mother or from neighbors or from teachers that are talking about really mitigating circumstances, they are the rotten social background kind of arguments, the abuse and the suffering that that individual experienced and those things show up in the brain. the brain is also a sponge. the brain isn't simply created by genetics and it's very much shaped by environment. and so my mentor john monaghan likened the problem of predicting violent people to predicting violent storms. when you think of meteorology, you think of the difficulty of classifying a hurricane and tracking a hurricane, making judgments about such complex behavior that has sort of chaotic premises underlying it, you're going to make lots of mistakes. you're going to make lots of mistakes in both directions. sometimes you're going to
? quayle: i had a very strong record on the environment and the united states senate. [laughter] i have a record where i voted for the legislation. i have a record where i voted against my president of the override of the clean water act. i voted for the major pieces of environmental legislation that has come down and voted on in the united states senate. this administration i support this administration and its environmental effort is moved in the area of the first time to deal with the ozone problem. we now have an international plan to become a treaty that is commonly referred to as the montreal treaty. for the first time we are talking about the impact of the progress of the environment. we are committed to the impairment to take the children hiking and fishing, walking in the woods we have the commitment to reserving in the environment, to bring up the environment we can't help but think about the environmental policy of the governor of massachusetts. he talked about being an environmentalist. let me tell you about his environmental policy. the boston harbor, the boston harbor whic
a little bit like this. now, it's a little bit warmer than the environment. how quickly does it cool? not very quickly because delta t is very small. if i put this in an oven and turn it red hot, take it outside. [makes sounds] this thing starts cooling like mad, okay? i mean, let's suppose every-- by you hear click, click, click, okay? red hot, click, click, click, click, click, click, click, click, click, click, click, click, click, see? one hot, click, click, make sense? it makes sense doesn't it? very, very--things that very, very hot compared to surrounding will cool out quickly. things that aren't so hot don't cool up so quickly, huh? so that's kinda make sense. if you got a can of beer or something, you wanna cool it down quickly. you put it in a fridge, someone says, "no, no. put it in a freezer, it'll cool faster." you say, "well, honey, if it gets down "to what the fridge is that's good enough. i'll just leave it in a fridge." who's right? put it in a fridge or the freezer, you wanna cool it faster. how many say same-same? if you wait five minutes it's the same. check your
the city, san francisco has created an environment that embraces and celebrates innovation. innovation is not a significant driver of economic growth, but it enables us to tackle some of the most long-standing problems and historic challenges that we face. that's why i continue to support and promote innovation in both the civic and private sectors to create a better san francisco. and with all of these technology companies that are moving into the city, we need to make sure that our work force is trained and ready to fill these positions. to do this we have launched tech sf with an $8 million dollar grant from the department of labor that will provided case, training and job placement assistance in the tech sector. whether it's for young people coming out of high school or college or people retooling in the middle of their careers or are returning our veterans who want a chance to work in our technology industry, we're working hard to ensure san francisco residents have the skills, the training and the opportunities to work in these jobs. this is a critical step to making sure tha
the project, studying the impact on the environment. croatia is also involved in the analysis. when we get all the data, croatia and bosnia-herzegovina will decide whether to realize the project. >> but a preliminary decision has already been made. the environmentalists say that water could be pumped out of this marshland. earlier this month, bosnia's republics signed an agreement with croatia to build three more power stations. environmentalists and farmers on both sides of the border are worried about the future. the environmentalists are united in their campaign to stop the power stations. such unity is something rare in this very divided region. coming up, dw are down at the frankfurt book fair where some celebrities have made an appearance. >> first, other stories making news around the globe. the german president has visited the czech capital of prague, highlighting the reconciled relationship between his country and the czech republic. he said he felt respect for the not see occupation -- -- respect for their recovery from the nazi occupation. >> germany has a high proportion of citizen
were welcomed. >> this is what i call a target-rich environment. >> reporter: but not in the cockpit. it wasn't just movies like "top gun." military brass argued fiercely against allowing females in combat aircraft. >> if you want to make a combat unit ineffective, assign some women to it. >> reporter: or so they thought. like it or not, things were about to change. >> the secretary of defense has ordered that all the services permit will tiomen to fly. >> for the air force the young lieutenant who garage waited at the top of her flight training class would be the first. >> i realize not every person wanted this to happen. some did, some didn't. i realize it is pretty irrelevant. >> when i started flying i didn't focus on me being different i focused on trying to do my best. >> reporter: but the pressure and spotlight on the first female combat aviators was enormous. just months after jeanie flynn finished flight school, the navy's first female carrier-based pilot crashed on approach. >> raise your gear. power. eject. eject. >> reporter: her death brought renewed calls of disapproval
clear that the external and internal environment wasn't looking favorable. the prolonged eurozone crisis and the possibility of so-called fiscal cliff in the u.s. is set to further send its dent on the exporters which is of course very important to the economy here. industrial activity also fell for a third month in a row and to top it all off, domestic demand is shrinking. retail sales dipped lower as koreans keep their wallets in their pockets, but all of this is in the cards. what surprised was the sharp cuts to growth projections this year and the next. meanwhile the central bank says its inflation target through 2015 to 3.5%, bok prices remaining low, those expected to stand pat until the end of this year and possibly cut once again in the first quarter of 12013. >> rhie, thanks for that. at the same time, the bank of japan minutes out today. members agree that japan's recovery has delayed considerably and some said they were concerned about the yen's strength. there's also fresh evidence of that slowing growth. core machinery orders in august dropped for the first time in three mon
the important things, they are all from pretty average environments. extremely different in terms of structure. does this go towards mitigation? how should it be used? how should this information be used to? i use it to dole out treatment. that is how i thought we would kick start this seminar. i am happy to answer any other questions. i did not do this all by myself. i had a lot of individuals who helped me with this data. this research is all funded by the national research of health, your tax dollars. thank you for your attention. i will turn over to our moderator. thank you. [applause] >> actually, i would like to, i'm going to ask a few questions, but i was hoping we could get a debate going here rather than with me trying to ask intelligent questions and just have the very smart people just talking amongst themselves to educate us. so one of the questions that we're wanting to talk about today was the idea of free will in terms of the criminal justice system. and i would like to ask each of you, is there a definition of free will in the context of your individual work? we'll start with y
of year of new shadows and 2, adopt findings under the california environment quality act, and number 2 is case number 2008 .0789k, 101 1st street, also known as the transbay tower block 3720 lot 001, this is the recreation and park commission to 1, recommend to the planning commission that the net new shadow from the proposed project at 101 first street will not have an adverse impact on union square, st. mary's square, portsmouth square, justin her man plaza, maritime mraz & woh hei yuen park, chinese recreation center and boeddeker park as riper by planning code section 295, 2, allocate net new shadow to the proposed projts at 101 first street for the following six park property union square, st. mary ice square, portsmouth square, justin her man plaza, maritime plaza, and we will ask that you then open the public hearing. first staff? >> good morning, commissioners, my name is karen, i'm a planner with the recreation and parks department, as the commission secretary has read the items out to you today, we're going to have -- there's two items for your consideration, first is a joi
, at successful restaurants and park environments. and where we are looking at incorporating this restaurant, at the park level, is there was a large elevator house where the parade elevators come up to the park level behind the amp i theatre and we are going to swallow that into the preft rest structure as depicted here and have some roof top seating on the restaurant as well. this is the concept that we are looking to incorporate into the drawings. and how that would look from the pedestrian pathway on the south side and the north side of the transit center. as you walked around the park. >> also, at the park level, we have made some significant revisions in the lighting systems for the park. the lighting system originally included a handrail that went along the pathway around the park and then relatively few mask lights to provide down lightinging on the park. you can see the elements here. these very tall, down lights and the handrail lighting. and in working with the on a number of funds for a design enhancements at the park, we did a lighting review of a lot number of exhibiting parks
even in the dense downtown environment. transbay park which is a one acre thark that will be created on the site of the transbay terminal was conceived of and the whole development program for the public parcels around it was crafted with sun, midday sun in mind, so you can see these are a couple of graphics from the transbay redevelopment plan, the heights on all the public parcels were crafted by the redevelopment agency and the planning department to preserve midday sun for most of that year, it goes back many years even on parks that were not rec park properties. there was a question, well, what about sidewalks, the planning code does provide for the planning commission and planning department to shape codes, it doesn't diminish the development of the parcels to preserve sun on sidewalks, there are a few sidewalks on certain streets on the downtown that have specific protections, none of them are relevant to the transbay district plan area, but it's up to the planning commission to look at and this is an item that's really sort of a micro issue that can be looked at on a project
important way to create an environment of changes around creating community support for education. leadershipen's program where we have worked with 400 people to inform them about the importance of women having access to numerous seats, literacy, and forming part of the community in terms of investing in jobs and learning. >> keep up the good work in afghanistan. you're watching bbc world news america. the chinese also picked up the nobel prize, we will tell you what is between the pages that one such high praise. the human rights group amnesty international says millions of people in china are affected by forced evictions from their land. the debt ridden local authorities are increasingly seizing and selling off land. martin has more on this story from beijing. >> we are in a neighborhood of beijing slated for demolition. this used to be somebody's,, horrible strewn across the place. if you look to my right, you can see just beyond another empty home. what is surprising is that many people have chosen to stay. i have seen an old man in the garden tending his vegetables and anothe
can ask for in this environment this week. >> all right. as you can see their opinions here definitely spanning the spectrum. we'll have more of those opinions throughout the day. we'll be back here live at 8:00 japan time with the prospective from the g-7 finance ministers point of view and we'll have lots more. so do please stay with us here. >> all right. thank you very much. >>> and do come to our web site to see all the conversations ron and his team have had with top economists at the imf world bank meeting. the address is right there on the bottom of your screen. >>> now hardly any of the talks at this week's conference begins or ends without mention of europe's financial troubles. they seem to worse within each passing day. spanish leaders are facing even more complications. a u.s. credit ratings agency has downgraded the country's sovereign bonds putting them on the outskirts of junk territory. standard & poors cut spain's rating by two notches. it's gone from triple b plus to triple b minus. that's only one notch above speculative status. s & p analysts blame the downgrade on
a whole lot of choice. we've decide as a society it's too expensive to modify the kids' environment, so we have to modify the kids." i have always been in favor of fixing society's problems by modifying children. ( laughter ) i mean, for one thing, we would not have so much crime if we just gave kids legal immunity and replaced their warms plasma cannons. the point is, students thrive when they get personal attention, and since we can't afford all the teachers it would take to give them that attention, we'll give them a pill that helps them pay attention. i just hope they don't pay attention to how little attention we're giving them. and don't worry. don't worry, folks. adderral helps kids focus. not because it's some amphetamine. because it's a combination of four amphetamines. it's like the colonel's secret recipe for speed ( laughter ) folks, i believe this is a great fiscally responsible answer, but we can do more. i mean, we might be cutting arts programs, but one tap of acid, and your kid will be seeing colors you can't find in a crayola box. ( laughter ) ( applause ) of course with
-free environment for the day that you are here. >> yes. >> stephen: so if i'm woozy right now it's because i haven't had my bacon. (laughter) why? why are you so militant about not only, like, not -- not you having meat but not even seeing meat? >> because animals are nicer than humans and they're conscious beings. (cheers and applause) >> stephen: really. >> yes. >> stephen: what about animals that eat other animals? can i eat a lion? >> only when they have to. >> stephen: what about one that's already dead. like a cow that's been sentenced to death for a murder? (laughter) or a pig that commits suicide from listening to too many of your songs? (laughter) >> you shouldn't laugh at that. >> stephen: i know a lamb that's a (bleep)ing ass (bleep). can i eat that lamb? can i eat that lamb? (laughter) >> if you spit your grandmother in an oven she will probably be tasty. but is that any reason to eat your grandmother. >> stephen: that reminds me, you have an album and a song "meat is murder." have you ever thought about the unintended consequences of saying that? because when i hear that i just think
and being educated in an environment that looks like that world benefits each and every person whose part of that environment. that's often forgotten because we tend to think of it only as what benefited the individual who might be admitted. because of affirmative action policies. >> eliot: which is why so many presidents of institutions of higher constitution say do not keep us the freedom-- >> it's very good to see the president of the university of texas on the steps of the supreme court defending this. there are those who are saying to the courts we need this type of administration system. we need today's world to considerate amongst a number of factors who we admit. >> eliot: let's pick up on that thread. you say race alone cannot be the the deter manet factor. has race become a smaller and smaller percentage of what you look at when you measure access to opportunity? >> i think most universities are looking at a wide variety of factors of which race is one. family background, what high school you went to, ethnicity grades, test scores, a whole range of factors, participation in extr
inflation adjusted terms has come down. our energy price environment because we've had an amazing gas revolution, is a much more favorable environment. we've had high productivity growth over a long period of time, so actual there will is some now reshoring going on. companies like g.e. are actually out there, bringing back at the margin, jobs they had shifted abroad to come here. that's the first -- >> you mentioned g.e., what about jack welch's tweet, challenging the unbelievable job numbers. these chicago guys will do anything. >> that's jack. that's jack welch. i think what laura is saying is so, so important. we have an opportunity in the business community, regardless of what happens in the election, and what we're talking about. republicans and democrats coming together to say it's not about politics, it's we have a fiscal cliff coming, 25% unemployment among the young this is not republican or democrat. this is not capitalist or occupy wall street. this is a problem for all of us, and what we do teahenry jackson initiative, we showcase companies, like -- like ibm, like starbuc
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